I had a lot of trouble with some rubygem warnings after upgrading to Ruby 1.9.1 and Rails 3.0 on Mac OS x Snow Leopard. They always occurred when I started the server within the project with the command

At first, when running on bundler 0.9.3, I had two types of errors. The first NoMethodError populated the terminal with hundreds lines of code, like …

The bundler-team around Carlhuda fixed that issue within bundler 0.9.4. So that problem will not occur any more.
The other problem was quite persistent. When starting the server via

or doing a test via

within the rails-3-project resulted in a bunch of warnings:

Jeremy Kemper from the Rails core team pointed out that this is not a Rails problem, but a RubyGems issue. Ruby 1.9 ships with an outdated RubyGems … like 1.9.1p378 ships with RubyGems 1.3.1. I did update RubyGems to Version 1.3.5 by

but this resulted in some duplicated rubygem files, which cause the error.

So how can the problem be solved? Deleting and reinstalling Ruby 1.9.1 does not have any effect … but the solution is quite simple:

If you already installed Ruby 1.9.1 and Rails 3.0 beta:

1. Be sure that you do NOT install RubyGems 1.3.5 separately after the installation of Ruby 1.9.1 – this would result in a double installation. So have that in mind when following the excellent instructions to installing Ruby, RubyGems, and Rails on Snow Leopard of Dan Benjamin.

2. If you already installed Ruby 1.9.1, updated to RubyGems 1.3.5 and bundler 0.9.4 and also installed Rails 3.0, the only thing you have to do is:

That’s it. No errors any more!

If you did not install Ruby 1.9.1 and Rails 3.0 yet …

1. You may start with Dan Benjamin’s recipe and modify it so you download, make and install the ruby-1.9.1-p378.tar.gz but NOT the rubygems-1.3.5.tgz.

2. Then update RubyGems with the command

3. Ensure that the rake and the sqlite3-ruby gems are installed, too.

4. Now install the needed gems and rails –pre as described in the Rails 3.0 beta release notes

5. After the successful installation of Rails 3.0 beta, you now have to do the vitally important step:

6. Finally check, if any gem needs an update before diving into Rails 3.0 by

Hope this helps … and saves some time. Thx Andy for the hint ;-)

Some days ago I published a first solution for reactivating printing on OKI-printers from Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard … some of you managed it to reactivate the printer by following the instructions – others are still coping with that problem. Also I was disappointed to see that the solution broke again and I wasn’t able to print from Snow Leopard again. That was really annoying – so I spent some time again to find a proper solution. Here it is: Version 2 of how to solve the problem … and as always: no guarantee and on your own risk:

Problem: After updating from Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard to OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard the installed printer driver for the OKI-postscript driver does not work anymore. Here it’s an OKI MFP C5540 … but it should also work with other models, like the OKI C5450 or C8800. The printer diver was installed under Leopard and worked quite well. After finishing the update to 10.6 you are able to send a print job to the printer, but an error message shows up in the print queue.

Diagnosis: Two bugs may cause the problem: Some of the OKI-printer drivers just disregard case sensitivity in their path names – this wasn’t a problem in former Mac OS X versions – but it is a problem in Snow Leopard. The other bug – which even leads to a malfunction if the path names are right – is some wrong file permissions. And this causes Snow Leopard to hiccup when you try to print on an OKI-Printer.

Solution: The easiest way to solve the problems and get rid of the bugs is following three major steps:

  1. Delete the old OKI printer drivers under the folder “/Library/Printers/” … if there are any.
  2. Install a new OKI driver. This will also create the folder “/Library/Printers/OKIDATA”. Then install the specific printer driver for your OKI-printer (especially the PPD file).
  3. Repair the file permissions.

You only need the OKI printer drivers and you have to put in some Terminal commands. But let’s do it step by step:

  • Log into your Mac as an administrator.
  • Step 1: Delete the old OKI files and folders:
  • Don’t forget to backup your data before you start!
  • Navigate to the following folder in the Finder and delete the folder “OKIDATA” or “Okidata” – if there is any.
  • Within the folder “PPDs” you may find also some OKI files – at my Mac it was “Oki C5540.ppd” – delete also these files.
  • Step 2: Re-installation of the OKI printer driver. The installation program of older printer drivers may cause problems when creating the “OKIDATA” folder: They may name this folder “Okidata” and put in an old OKfilterA-file.
  • Therefore you should download and install the printer driver for C5550n-MFP of OKI-USA specifically for Leopard users first. Just click on the “Mac OS X.5″ link on the printer driver page of OKIDATA-USA, download the installer.
  • Then start the installer and put in your password. The installation program will create the folder “OKIDATA” as needed.
  • If the C5550n MFP is not the OKI printer you have, you have to download install also the specific printer driver for your OKI-printer model. I had to choose the C5540n MFP. The installation will not overwrite the folder OKIDATA and only put’s the missing PPDs into the right folders.
  • Step 3: Repair folder & file permissions. Open the program “Terminal” – you’ll find it under “Programs/Utilities”.
  • Input the following command into the appearing command-line window and finish it with pressing the return-key:
  • Now, you’ll be prompted for your password … so put in your password of the admin account and finish the input by pressing the return key again
  • Input a second command into the command-line window and finish it with pressing the return-key:
  • A little complicated – but it works. Just exit the Terminal program and restart your Mac. Then you can setup your OKI-printer and select the specific OKI-printer driver manually.

Printer drivers under Mac OS 10.6 Snow Leopard are still sometimes causing trouble. After explaining how to reactivate an OKI-printer – here is the solution for an Kyocera-Mita-printer … and as always: no guarantee and on your own risk:

Problem: After updating from Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard to OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard the installed printer driver for the Kyocera-postscript driver does not work anymore. Here it’s an Kyocera Mita FS-2000D … but it should also work with other models. The printer diver was installed under Leopard and worked quite well. After finishing the update to 10.6 you are able to send a print job to the printer, but an error message shows up in the print queue.

Diagnosis:There are incorrect file permissions under Snow Leopard fort he Kyocera printer driver … and this causes some trouble. BTW a warm thank you to @kappuchino for his diagnosis and solution!

Solution:There is nothing like fixing the bug yourself ;-) You can easily fix the problem by one command in the Terminal:

  1. Log into your Mac as an administrator.
  2. Open the program “Terminal” – you’ll find it under “Programs/Utilities”.
  3. Input the following command into the appearing command-line window and finish it with pressing the return-key:
  4. Now, you’ll be prompted for your password … so put in your password of the admin account and finish the input by pressing the return key again
  5. That’s it. Just Close the Terminal program. Now printing on the Kyocera printer should be work like a charm.

I just updated to Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard. My hard disk was still partitioned with the old Apple partition scheme – but Snow Leopard needs the new GUI partition scheme. So I had to do more as usual to do the update: First a complete backup of my hard disk (you absolutely should do this every time you update your system), then I had to erase and repartition the HD with the GUI partition scheme. After that I was able to install Snow Leopard and transfer my user data from the backup, the programs, etc. with the Migration-Assistant.

Using Snow Leopard feels great and you immediately recognize the speed. Looks like all of the Apple engineers work “under the hood” was worth it! You should not expect fundamental changes within the user interface or other totally new features – the core of Snow Leopard are speed, detail improvements and technology upgrades.

But what’s about the compatibility to non-Apple-hardware products? Sadly, printing on my OKI laser printer does not work with the Leopard-compatible driver for the Oki MFP C5540. By using the preinstalled generic PS-printer-driver from Apple you are able to print on the OKI printer – you even an control the duplex unit. But you are not able to control all the specific printer settings like print quality, grayscale instead of color printing or specifying the installed memory on the printer. But, who knows how long Oki will need to update their printer drivers for Snow Leopard? That’s why I started debugging myself. So, here is the solution for all the fellow sufferers who also own an OKI printer … and as always: no guarantee and on your own risk:

Problem: After updating from Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard to OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard the installed printer driver for the OKI-postscript driver does not work anymore. Here it’s an OKI MFP C5540 … but it should also work with other models, like the OKI C5450 or C8800. The printer diver was installed under Leopard and worked quite well. After finishing the update to 10.6 you are able to send a print job to the printer, but an error message shows up in the print queue.

UPDATE: You’ll find an updated diagnosis & solution in the NEW BLOGPOST!

Diagnosis: There is a bug in the printer driver … the bug had no effect under Leopard (maybe because of the Apple partition scheme). When OKI coded the printer driver, they disregarded case sensitivity in their path names … former systems did not care about case sensitivity – but Snow Leopard does!
Solution: The fast work around is to use the generic PostScript-printer driver – but there you don’t have the possibility to set the OKI-specific printer settings. That doesn’t make me happy ;-) To get back the whole functionality of the Leopard OKI-printer driver there is only one way: Hands on coding and debug ;-) Fortunately fixing the bug is no rocket science – you only need a text editor like TextEdit or TextMate and you don’t be scared program code:

  1. Search for your Oki-printer driver PPD-file in the Finder … you should find it under

    mine is called “Oki C5540.ppd”.
  2. Before you go on make a backup of this file … this way you always can come back to the original state. ;-)
  3. Open the PPD-file with the text editor and search for the following line:
  4. Then search for the file “OKfilterA” … I found mine under the following:
  5. Now, adjust the path in the PPD-file … the line in my corrected PPD-file looks like this:
  6. Now, you only have to save the file and restart your Mac … now it should work ;-)

In the last days, there is a lot of whispering: Here a Chinese iPod skin manufacturer publishes a small iPhone skin on his website, an analyst wishes for an iPhone for the mass marked … and bang, everybody is expecting an iPhone nano to be announced. Then the news is spreaded, that Steve Wozniak – second founder of Apple – will join the presentation of the newest modbook at the Axiotron booth at MacWorldExpo … it’s a MacBook transformed into a tablet Mac. That increases the desire and spins the rumor mill even faster for an iPod tablet or MacBook touch. However, the market positioning of such a multitouch-gadget will be tricky:

  • If Apple stays with the walled garden iPhone version of Mac OS X they would have the existing and vital iPhone developer community committed to multitouch and gesture control … and by the way an exclusive distribution channel for applications with the AppStore. The main focus probably would be gaming and entertainment. But the gadget will loose the “pants pocket factor”.
  • If Apple uses a full Mac OS X version they could use the experiences of Axiotron and have to count on the Mac OS X developers, that they implement the benefits and potentials of multitouch and gesture control within their (existing) applications. The gadget would be more like a “MacBook Air Touch” than an iPod tablet and would more likely suite and target the business customers. En passent this would explain why there is so little spectacular information about the new Mac OS X Snow Leopard features leaked out.

What ever Phil Schiller will present on his Keynote at the Moscow-Center at MacWorldExpo in San Francisco on January 6th … and what is hidden behind the concealed exhibition banners … I’m thrilled and I’m really looking forward to it ;-)